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Author Heather Hansman to present Nov. 20 SEFS Seminar, “Writing Conservation Stories”

On Nov. 20, the UW School of Environmental and Forest Sciences will welcome Heather Hansman, author of “Downriver into the Future of Water in the West.” She will present, “Writing Conservation Stories,” a talk on writing about complicated conservation topics, why water makes people emotional, and how to tell all sides of a story. 

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New York Times publishes graduate student Olivia Sanderfoot’s letter to editor

School of Environmental and Forest Sciences graduate student and National Science Foundation graduate research fellow Olivia Sanderfoot’s letter to the editor about a proposed rule that would limit research used to determine federal environmental regulations was published in the opinion section of The New York Times on Tuesday. 

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Rose Graves to present “Natural Climate Solutions in Oregon” at Nov. 13 SEFS Seminar

On Nov. 13, the UW School of Environmental and Forest Sciences will welcome Rose Graves, post-doctoral research associate with Portland State University. She will present “Natural Climate Solutions in Oregon: Potential Greenhouse Gas Reductions from Conservation and Land Management.”
The seminar begins at 3:30 p.m. 

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SEFS doctoral student presents research at NAISA International Conference

This summer, a School of Environmental and Forest Sciences graduate student attended the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association (NAISA) International Conference in New Zealand.
Jessica Hernandez, a Ph.D. student and National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow, participated in a panel entitled, “The Future of Research is Indigenous: Culturally Grounding Our Indigenous Scholarship” and shared her doctoral work through a presentation, “Indigenizing Conservation in a Changing Climate: Developing a Community Comprehensive Plan of Daybreak Star Indian Cultural Center’s Future Land Use” along with co-advisor Dr. 

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SEFS graduate student investigates invasive pests for research

The creepy crawlies that UW School of Environmental and Forest Sciences graduate student Alex Pane investigates are even scarier than they appear. Pane, who was featured in a story by The Daily about his work, recently conducted a study on two major pests found in the Pacific Northwest that kill trees: the Douglas-fir beetle and the western spruce budworm. 

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