UW School of Environmental and Forest Sciences professor Kristiina Vogt recently discussed a book she co-authored on the environmental decision-making process of Indigenous people on a Michigan State University Press podcast.

In the episode, Vogt and her co-author Michael E. Marchand discuss the book, The Medicine Wheel: Environmental Decision-Making Process of Indigenous Peoples, and its goal to lay the context for how to connect Western Science and Indigenous knowledge frameworks to form a holistic and ethical decision process for the environment.

A description of the book reads: “The Medicine Wheel built by Indigenous people acknowledges that ecosystems experience unpredictable recurring cycles and that people and the environment are  interconnected. The Western science knowledge framework is incomplete unless localized intergenerational knowledge is respected and becomes part of the problem-definition and solution process. The goal of this book is to lay the context for how to connect Western science and Indigenous knowledge frameworks to form a holistic and ethical decision process for the environment. What is different about this book is that it not only describes the problems inherent to each knowledge framework but also offers new insights for how to connect culture and art to science knowledge frameworks. Read this book and learn how you can move beyond stereotypes to connect with nature.”

Listen to the podcast here.