Beth Gardner

  • Associate Professor
    • 206-685-9995
  • Visit Beth's website
  • Beth Gardner

    • Associate Professor

    Research areas

    Hierarchical models, spatial capture-recapture models, occupancy models, camera trapping, hair snares, sampling techniques, spatial statistics, Bayesian inference

    B.S., Mathematics and Environmental Science, Allegheny College
    M.S., Natural Resources, Cornell University
    Ph.D., Natural Resources; Minors: Biometry, GIS, Cornell University

    Beth Gardner is not currently accepting new students. 

    Courses

    • ESRM 451 | Analytical Methods in Wildlife Science (3) - Winter

    Current Sponsored Projects

    • Monitoring and mapping of Avian Resources over Selected Areas of the Great Lakes to Support Related Resource Management
      We will explore a breadth of potential modeling approaches focused on: 1) identification of “hotspot” and “coldspot” locations; 2) relationships of waterbird occurrences/abundances to relevant environmental covariates; and 3) standardizing data across differing sampling protocols.
      We will explore a breadth of potential modeling approaches focused on: 1) identification of “hotspot” and “coldspot” locations; 2) relationships of waterbird occurrences/abundances to relevant environmental covariates; and 3) standardizing data across differing sampling protocols. Our results will help determine the future sampling and modeling priorities while informing current waterbird conservation priorities and should provide a useful first step in management decisions on wind energy development in the Great Lakes.

    Selected publications

    Cove. M., Simons, T.R., Gardner, B., and O’Connell, A.F.  2019. Towards recovery of an endangered island endemic: distributional and behavioral responses of Key Largo woodrats to exotic predator removal. Biological Conservation. 237:423-429.

    Sussman, A., Gardner, B., Adams, E., Salas, L., Kenow, K., Luukkonen, D., Monfils, M., Mueller, W., Williams, K., Leduc-Lapierre, M., Zipkin, E.F.  2019. A comparative analysis of common methods to identify waterbird hotspots. Methods in Ecology and Evolution. 10:1454-1468.

    Hostetter, N.J., Gardner, B., Sillett, T.S., Pollock, K.H., and Simons, T.R.  2019. An integrated model decomposing the components of detection probability and abundance in unmarked populations. Ecosphere. (3):e02586. 10.1002/ecs2.2586

    Parsons, M.A., Lewis, J.C., Gardner, B., Chestnut, T., Ransom, J.I., Werntz, D., and Prugh, L.R.  2019. Habitat selection and spatiotemporal interactions of a reintroduced mesocarnivore.  Journal of Wildlife Management. 83:117-1184.

    Gardner, B., Sollmann, R., Kumar, N.S., Jathanna, D., and Karanth, K.U. 2018. Challenges in open population spatial capture-recapture models. Ecology and Evolution. 8:10336–10344

    Cove. M., Simons, T.R., Gardner, B., and O’Connell, A.F. Co-occurrence dynamics of endangered Lower Keys marsh rabbits and free ranging domestic cats. Ecology and Evolution. 8:4042-4052

    Lashley, M.A., Cove, M.V., Chitwood, M.C., Penido, G., Gardner, B., Deperno, C.S., and Moorman, C.E. Estimating wildlife activity curves: comparison of methods and sample size. Scientific Reports. 8:4173.

    Goyert, H.F., Gardner, B., Veit, R.R., Gilbert, A.T., Connelly, E.E., Duron, M., Johnson, S., and Williams, K. A.  Evaluating habitat, prey, and mesopredator associations in a community of marine birds. ICES Journal of Marine Science. doi:10.1093/icesjms/fsy020

    Sollmann, R., Gardner, B., Gilbert, A. T., Williams, K., Viet, R.R. 2016. Investigating the abundance and distribution of seabirds using a community distance sampling model. Methods in Ecology and Evolution. Available online early.

    Flanders, N.P., Gardner, B., Winiarski, K.J., Paton, P.W.C., Allison, T., and O’Connell, A.F. 2015. Using a community occupancy model to identify key seabird areas in southern New England. Marine Ecology Progress Series. 553:277-290.

    Hostetter, N.J., B. Gardner, S.H. Schweitzer, R. Boettcher, A.L. Wilke, L. Addison, W.R. Swilling, K.H. Pollock, and T.R. Simons. 2015. Repeated count surveys help standardize multi-agency estimates of American Oystercatcher (Haematopus palliatus) abundance. The Condor. 117(3): 354-363.

    Botero, C.A., Gardner, B., Kirby, K., Bulbulia, J., Gavin, M., and Gray, R. 2014. The ecology of religious beliefs. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 111(47): 16784-16789.

    Ergon, T. and Gardner, B. 2014. Separating mortality and emigration: modelling space use,dispersal, and survival with robust design spatial capture-recapture data. Methods in Ecology and Evolution. 5(12):1327-1336.